Sunday, 3 March 2013

Movie Review - Django Unchained

The extra scene isn't really that important, really.

   Yes, it's another Quentin Tarantino movie. You know what to expect. Buckets of blood and oodles of profanity. On with the carnage!
I want to be wanted too.
   Set in the era of human trafficking, Django is a black slave freed by a German bounty hunter. Their friendship grows and they work on several assignments but the main job is releasing Django's wife from 'Candyland'.
I suppose it counts as romance too.
   Tarantino doesn't really have to go for a message against slavery and racism for his film. His goal is to entertain and possibly to offend. The term 'nigger' being thrown about isn't something to be shocked about as it is common during the decade. The showers of blood from gunshots were exaggerated for style and humor. The consequences of the dog scene weren't really shown so it's the mandingo affair that could cause stomachs to turn.
Brokeback Mountain?
   The plot would be a classic tale of righteousness, with the creation of a tough guy icon, cowboying it up macho style. Some tricks of storytelling are used but the magic mostly depended on wit and performance of the actors. Scenes are lengthen for the sake of dialogue being stretched and possibly to build up the atmosphere for both humor and horror purposes.

"I've got white hair.  That counts for something, right?"
   Jamie Foxx is a stoic, silent type, showing strength in stillness. Leonardo DiCaprio chews up the scenery with his extravagant role, exuding sophistication and menace. Samuel L. Jackson plays himself, though older and more despicable. Don Johnson is unrecognizable as the bigot Big Daddy. Quentin Tarantino deserves to be blown up for his accent. The gem of a character is Christoph Waltz as the eccentric dentist of lethal renown. His inflection and slightly odd behavior as a gentleman makes him charming and quite likable. He is the one who receives the most complex personality in a sea of almost one dimensional roles.
Nothing up my sleeve... oh wait.
   The film is quite entertaining, with the extreme violence and sharp wit coupled with vicious humor and suspenseful bits. It's par the course for Tarantino so it's good for his hungry fans and casual thrill seekers.  You really just have to relax and enjoy the carnage.  It will be shown on March 13 with no cuts so watch out for it!
Red snow is actually worse than yellow snow.
SPOILERS!!!  Don't look unless you want to pay a visit to Candyland!  It's ok to see the pictures provided by Columbia Pictures though.
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Smoking kills!

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   What was the significance of the blue clothes that Django chose?
White is everywhere.
    The winter scene made me oddly emotional in the spirit of Brokeback Mountain.
Stand up for your rights!  Not.
   The murder in front of the boy was referenced later on but still didn't seem expounded upon enough. Too subtle?
Crafty little devil
   I totally blame Django and his wife for not being careful enough. Things would have gone as smooth as silk if it wasn't for their emotional tells. Though credit does go to Samuel L. Jackson's despicable character for picking up on it.
I'm a dentist, y'know.
   I was quite put out by the death of Schultz. He was so angry at that point but it was boiling under the surface. But I'm pretty happy the candy man ate it, haha. Take that, Leo!

Bang bang bang!
    Why in the world did Django have to shoot the sister? She didn't do anything.

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